CONSERVATION MODULE

This one is close to our hearts.

 

In some way or Given the challenges surrounding government funding for conservation areas (public, National Parks, game reserves etc), we at Teambuilding Alliance through our passion for nature and wildlife, and years and years of working in these areas, have, in conjunction with various conservation authorities come up with unique ways of supporting many important wildlife initiatives and projects.

RHINO NOTCHING

At present the focus is on creating a database of information on each rhino within the various protected areas in and around South Africa.

 

To increase our knowledge of rhinos, the project uses a technique of “notching” where a specific pattern is cut into the ears which enables ground monitors to individually identify that animal, who it is with, where it stays and other biological data such as birth intervals.At the same time DNA is collected as part of the National Rhino Project that analyses and stores this data that can be used as evidence in the case of rhino poaching.

Parks we do this in: Pilanesberg, Madikwe, Klaserie and Timbavati.

PILANSBERG  WILD DOG

COLLARING

Wild dogs were reintroduced into Pilanesberg in 1998 and have been successful in their breeding and survival ever since.

 

Wild dogs are a highly mobile species and can cover great distances in a short time.Their movements over the years has shown a distinct pattern of remaining close to the fence line boundary of the park, which can be associated with prey capture (the dogs have “learnt” to use the fence as an effective tool in catching their prey) and possibly in avoiding lions which will kill wild dogs if they get the opportunity.

 

Monitoring the movements of the current Pilanesberg pack of eleven wild dogs relies on the technology of a satellite collar to track them on a daily basis. At the moment the pack is in need of renewing of their collars. 

ELEPHANT COLLARING

Whilst it is great to see these majestic animals in their natural habitat, large populations of elephants. 

 

unfortunately can eventually have a negative impact on protected areas as their numbers grow beyond the ability of the land to support them.

 

This in turn affects other animals and the overall biodiversity of the Park and its landscapes.

 

The lethal removal of elephants through culling is a situation that authorities would like to avoid if at all possible and, with the advances in contraception, park authorities are looking at this option to stabilize the various elephant populations in Southern Africa.

WE HAVE PLENTY MORE CONSERVATION MODULES - REACH OUT TO US HERE

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